Heightened academic demands cause “domino effect,” leading to teen depression

Stressful+Classes+-+Students+in+Algebra+Teacher+Jake+Burgdorf%27s+class+struggle+through+an+assignment+based+on+new+material+they+had+just+been+taught.+Student%27s+who+do+not+understand+such+material%2C+end+up+stressing+about+it+-+a+situation+that+begins+a+vicious+cycle+that+can+lead+to+depression+if+allowed+to+progress+too+far.
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Heightened academic demands cause “domino effect,” leading to teen depression

Stressful Classes - Students in Algebra Teacher Jake Burgdorf's class struggle through an assignment based on new material they had just been taught. Student's who do not understand such material, end up stressing about it - a situation that begins a vicious cycle that can lead to depression if allowed to progress too far.

Stressful Classes - Students in Algebra Teacher Jake Burgdorf's class struggle through an assignment based on new material they had just been taught. Student's who do not understand such material, end up stressing about it - a situation that begins a vicious cycle that can lead to depression if allowed to progress too far.

Stressful Classes - Students in Algebra Teacher Jake Burgdorf's class struggle through an assignment based on new material they had just been taught. Student's who do not understand such material, end up stressing about it - a situation that begins a vicious cycle that can lead to depression if allowed to progress too far.

Stressful Classes - Students in Algebra Teacher Jake Burgdorf's class struggle through an assignment based on new material they had just been taught. Student's who do not understand such material, end up stressing about it - a situation that begins a vicious cycle that can lead to depression if allowed to progress too far.

by Lauryn Harris, Staff Writer

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Social gatherings, status, wild experiences, and hard work describes the typical lives of teens in high school.

In our world, today’s youth is presented with expectations and standards of the new age leading to changed state of mind. 

“All we stress about is work overload and boys,” junior Herlanda Pierre-Moise said.

In 2015 alone, an estimated three million adolescents ages 12 to 17 were reported to have at least one major depressive episode, according to The National Institute of Mental Health.

Sharon Horton, currently a HR representative for a home help agency, said that “stress is almost like depression.”

“It’s like they are kin to each other,” Horton said. “But stress is inevitable, like a hump in the road everyone can overcome. Depression is more of an impression that restrains you from solving problems.”

Horton also believes that staying in a harmful situation that can be avoided “could lead to a road of destruction like a domino effect.”

Social studies teacher Barbara Beyke said that extracurricular activities are an “outlet” for some to relieve stress and depression.

“For others they lead to stress (time management, more expectations, in it for the checklist and not the interest),” Beyke said. “The more chronic the stress becomes, the more likely for sustained signs of depression,” Beyke said.

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