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The Tribal Times

Beautiful: The People’s Definition

by Briana Clinkscales, Staff Writer

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The media has perceived beauty to be a lot focused on one type of person, than to take advantage of the universal beauty in the world today.

 

In the U.S., we look to models and celebrities for our beauty standards; they’re usually tall, thin, and elegant. Due to different states being considered a melting pot, we find beauty in all types. Beauty standards are always going to be contrasted in various places around the world. Different cultures, races, ethnicities, genders, and body structures are put on display for others to judge the outward appearance of another.

 

In Iran, the citizens consider surgical bandages to be a symbol of beauty. Iran is the rhinoplasty capital of the world, so both men and women embrace the procedure by leaving the bandages on longer than necessary simply to flaunt that they’ve received the procedure. Indian brides often put a mixture of turmeric, lemon, and honey on their skin to appear glowing on their special day, along with wearing a kumkum on their forehead and henna tattoos to appear more attractive. Many Kayan women in Burma will wrap brass coils around their necks while young, adding more as they age. It is seen as the ultimate sign of female elegance and status. Many Asian countries have a high rate of eye lift procedures: some Korean women choose to have this procedure done so that their eyes will appear bigger. The procedure opens eyes, adds a crease in the eye lid, and makes them look more western; to them, this is a symbol of beauty. In the Karo tribe in Ethiopia, young girls have scars cut on their bodies in intricate, swirling patterns to create a beautiful design to attract a husband. Once a girl is finished receiving the scars, she is old enough to be married and start a family. The Maori people of New Zealand have been decorating their faces with swirling blue tattoos called “moko” for centuries. Originally a sign of wealth for their ancestors, today most Maori people have moko. For women, the ultimate sign of beauty is full, blue lips and tattoos on the chin.

 

It is impossible to define beauty because it contradicts from place to place. What is considered attractive in one country may be undesirable in another; beauty is unique everywhere that there’s life.

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The student news site of McEachern High School in Powder Springs, Georgia
Beautiful: The People’s Definition