Memory

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Memory

by Carnell Lyon, Staff Writer

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Memory is the processes by which we recall, process, and absorb information and it is a process that takes place in our every day lives.

Synaptic consolidation is the process by which a memory is strengthened in terms of its precedence and relevance. A popular theory is that specific neuronal connections are made pertaining to the information, the brain then repeatedly activates this pattern until it is solidified as data. 

The first thing we must understand are the two types of memory: short and long. Short term memory has two primary functions: making connections to the past and the present, and the storage of data in a short span of time. Short term memory lasts from the span of 20 seconds to a day and the average short-term storage capacity is at least seven units of information plus or minus two. Given its functionality, short term is also known as working memory. Long-term is for the permanent storage of information for a later date of recall. These two go hand-in-hand and I see long-term memory as a precursor to short-term memory.

Memory randomly changes, given the circumstances of the individual, the stability of their mind, and a few other standards as well; however to me, this gives insight into the complex structure of human brain. For example, crptomnesia is the psychology and neurological phenomenon by which an individual recollects something but recognizes it as something new.

Psychology is meant to make the seemingly complicated world of the human mind, simple.

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