• JROTC Leads to the Future:
    The opportunity to honor someone that is in the military is a big step for JROTC students because many have military plans after high school themselves. “I might go into the national guard or I might go into the navy,” freshman cadet Brett Hurst said. About 15% of the graduating seniors enlist into a branch of the military.
    “Being in JROTC teaches you discipline, which is great if you want to serve the United States,” sophomore Isaac Cruz said. “I chose to be in color guard because not only did I want to serve our country but I also wanted to try something different. I love the fact that the program has a lot to offer.”
    (photo by Sydney King)
  • Raise the Flag to Raise a Statement:
    The American flag is raised on campus everyday, symbolizing patriotism and representing the struggles that soldiers of soldiers in the nation. “One of our goals in JROTC is to teach patriotism, so what is a better way to symbolize it than the American Flag?” Commander Brandan Harris said. “We use the flag daily in our training to teach the pride of patriotism in America.”
    (photo by DeAira McCrory)
  • Sacrifice and Commitment:
    Most people view the American flag as something that represents our country. But being in JROTC students have a different perspective on it. JROTC students see the flag as a very important symbol in their lives. “The American flag represents the hard work, and the honor, courage that one has for the country,” senior Levi Rivard said.
    (photo by DeAira McCrory)
  • Honor and Courage:
    “The national flag is the sun and everybody else is the universe,” Commander Brandon Harris said. When flags are displayed in a row, the U.S flag always goes to the observer’s left. All 50 of the states have flags that are displayed and held by JROTC members. They are not put in any order, for each state is equal to each other.
    (photo by Sydney King)
  • Then and Now:
    “I feel very recognized throughout McEachern, it’s also nice to see other veterans around campus,” coach Philip Hoskins said. When Hoskins was in the Army, he was a sergeant and served for four and a half years with a National guard ranking.
    (photo by DeAira McCrory)
  • Accomplishments and Achievements:
    Dr. Connie Holloway served in the military for twenty four years, and ranked first class sergeant. She earned patches and pins including a Unit path, National defense army, Army service, and a Bronze star. “When I served in the Navy I got an award for good conduct, sharp shooter, an award for being in the military during desert storm, I got an award for years of service, and for outstanding cadet,” Holloway said.
    (photo by Sydney King)
  • Perseverance:
    First year NJROTC students enter as a Cadet Seaman Recruit; in order to recieve a promotion they must demonstrate high moral standards, good conduct, proper uniform appearance, acceptable academic achievement, and acceptable JROTC responsibilities.
    The next promotions are Cadet Seaman Apprentice, Cadet Seaman, Cadet Petty Officer 3rd Class, Cadet Petty Officer 2nd Class, Cadet Petty Officer 1st Class, Cadet Petty Officer, Cadet Senior Chief Petty Officer and, Cadet Master Chief Petty Officer. If a cadet completes these promotions they are eligible to become officers; Cadet Ensign,Cadet Lieutenant Junior Grade,Cadet Lieutenant, Cadet Lieutenant Commander, and Cadet Commander.
    “As a Commander you are responsible for setting overall policies and standards. But as a leader you are responsible for providing guidance and assistance that is necessary for soldiers to perform their duties,” senior Levi Rivard said. (photo by Sydney King)
  • Importance of Presentation:
    “It’s important to look presentable because the uniform represents you, it represents your unit, and organization,” Commander Brandan Harris said. “We teach them how to wear the uniform properly and to pay attention to details because it teaches them two things: one being how to properly follow details, and two it gives them a sense of pride in their appearance. You never get a second chance to make a first impression.”
    JROTC students prepare for a dress inspection every Wednesday. Students wear uniforms that are provided by the military which are custom-fitted to each cadet. The uniform consists of a pair of trousers, shoes, black socks, shirt, black belt and buckle. An alternate uniform may be worn if you are on a special team or a senior cadet. Cadets earn awards for their rank to put on their uniform. (photo by Sydney King)
  • Weight of the ‘Veteran’:
    Support is the number one thing that Veterans need from their families. “There’s tons of national programs in the country.There’s programs that not only caters for veterans themselves, but their immediate family members,” Commander Harris said. Everyday, soldiers and veterans alike risk their lives for the United States, and soon so will high school students.
    (photo by Sydney King)
  • JROTC Leads to the Future:
    The opportunity to honor someone that is in the military is a big step for JROTC students because many have military plans after high school themselves. “I might go into the national guard or I might go into the navy,” freshman cadet Brett Hurst said. About 15% of the graduating seniors enlist into a branch of the military.
    “Being in JROTC teaches you discipline, which is great if you want to serve the United States,” sophomore Isaac Cruz said. “I chose to be in color guard because not only did I want to serve our country but I also wanted to try something different. I love the fact that the program has a lot to offer.”
    (photo by Sydney King)
  • Raise the Flag to Raise a Statement:
    The American flag is raised on campus everyday, symbolizing patriotism and representing the struggles that soldiers of soldiers in the nation. “One of our goals in JROTC is to teach patriotism, so what is a better way to symbolize it than the American Flag?” Commander Brandan Harris said. “We use the flag daily in our training to teach the pride of patriotism in America.”
    (photo by DeAira McCrory)

by Sydney King, Staff Writer