• McEachern is a prime example of a community becoming healthier by teaching “ the healthy and non-healthy versions, to give students a better understanding of what is healthy,” said the culinary teacher Katherine Daniel “ I buy fresh produce from Kroger or restaurant depots and we only cook from scratch, no boxes, and we arehigh in vegetables.” (photo by Jedidah Taylor)
  • Facing Facts:
    According to health care provider AtlantiCare, one out of 20 Americans are obese. This trend led to First Lady Michelle Obama launching the Let’s Move campaign in schools across America in February 2010, wanting to change the way Americans think about food.
    “It’s not the school’s fault kids are obese,” cafeteria worker Beth Stillwell said. “Our one meal a day isn’t life changing, it’s the other meals that add up. Blame on schools needs to be redirected towards encouraging lifestyle changes and new activities.” (photo by Alexis Moreno)
  • Their Legacy:
    “Everyone has a role to play in reducing childhood obesity, including parents, elected officials from all levels of government, schools, health care professionals, faith-based and community-based organizations, and private sector companies. Your involvement is key to ensuring a healthy future for our children,” according to the let’s move website.
    The campaign tries to make it easy for parents and teachers to get involved, by developing a 5 step program to encourage healthy living to both children and adults. These five step include:
    Move every day, Try a new fruit or veggie, Drink lots of water, Do jumping jacks to break up TV time, and Help make dinner. (photo by Let’s Move Campaign)
  • Embracing Change:
    Let’s Move! is a comprehensive initiative, launched by the First Lady, dedicated to solving the challenge of childhood obesity within a generation, so that children born today will grow up healthier and able to pursue their dreams.
    “Eating healthy is important to me because in 2006 my dad was diagnosed with diabetes and kidney failure, and I decided that couldn’t be me,” senior Darius Thomas said. “Being healthy is a continuous process; just this year we are changing the way we eat, like instead of frying fish we grill it or instead of soda we drink water.” (photo by Alexis Moreno)
  • Ensuring a Future:
    According to the Let’s Move website, Obama’s goal is to ensure every family has access to healthy, affordable food. And, helping kids become more physically active.
    “What the campaign is trying to do is good, but it’s not affecting the student’s physical life’s in school directly,” P.E. coach Phyllis Arthur said. “Kids aren’t going to make healthy choices because they want to. The campaign would be more effective if it targeted adults in communities rather than schools. The adult models need to learn that dieting isn’t about losing weight; it’s about living, then the kids will learn too.” (photo by Jedidah Taylor)
  • Student Awareness:
    “I feel the campaign helped bring more awareness,” administrator Alvin Thomas said.
    Obama raised awareness by setting up support systems in communities, and by getting people excited about being active through viral videos like “The Evolution of Mom Dancing” on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. The campaign’s website spread awareness as well, by giving facts and explaining grassroot approach to spreading the word by “starting a conversation” to help gain awareness for the campaign and the issues surrounding it.
    (photo by Alexis Moreno)
  • Regrouping:
    The let’s move campaign affects schools and the food they sell there, for example, in every lunch lane there are healthy foods like orange slices, apples, and bananas.
    Since the start of the campaign McEachern’s food options are now low fat, reduced calories, or baked. The school was required to cut out all fried foods.
    “Initially, there was drastically less snack and food sells, but it’s starting to pick up now that students saw the changes weren’t leaving and there was no other options,” cafeteria worker Beth Stillwell said. (photo by Alexis Moreno)
  • Holding On:
    Mceachern’s vending machines are now filled with water and diet soda drinks, the healthier zero calorie alternative to regular sugary sodas that once filled the machines.
    By setting up the machines around the 18 buildings on McEachern’s campus, students have ability to drink sodas on their own whim.
    “I buy drinks out the vending machines, but I would buy a lot more if they weren’t diet,” junior Antonio Cabrera said. “Diet cuts down on flavor and crispness of the drink.”
    (photo by Alexis Moreno)
  • The Probability:
    Since the campaign, McEachern’s desserts have become whole wheat and whole grain. The school sold approximately 1,000 cookies a day before the campaign and now sell about 500 a day.
    “I used to spend all my money buying cookies, but now they’re not as good,” senior Brian Smith said. (photo by Alexis Moreno)
  • McEachern is a prime example of a community becoming healthier by teaching “ the healthy and non-healthy versions, to give students a better understanding of what is healthy,” said the culinary teacher Katherine Daniel “ I buy fresh produce from Kroger or restaurant depots and we only cook from scratch, no boxes, and we arehigh in vegetables.” (photo by Jedidah Taylor)
  • Facing Facts:
    According to health care provider AtlantiCare, one out of 20 Americans are obese. This trend led to First Lady Michelle Obama launching the Let’s Move campaign in schools across America in February 2010, wanting to change the way Americans think about food.
    “It’s not the school’s fault kids are obese,” cafeteria worker Beth Stillwell said. “Our one meal a day isn’t life changing, it’s the other meals that add up. Blame on schools needs to be redirected towards encouraging lifestyle changes and new activities.” (photo by Alexis Moreno)

by Alexis Moreno, Staff Writer