Downtown:

Urban farming is the utilization of unused space to be transformed into a garden to grow crops for people in need in the urban community. Farmers find purpose in empty parking lots, building tops, and the empty space between architecture. Resourcefulness is key during cold weather to ensure that the crops last longer than a season, so raised garden beds are used so that farmers are able to plant earlier in the season by raising the soil off of the ground so that it’s warmer and better drained. (photo by Jedidah Taylor)

 

Clever Inventions:

“It’s like a child; you watch a child grow and choose how you want to raise it,” junior Ivy Nix said. “The same with crops, you see the development of your crops and get to invent ways to garden.” In urban communities, finding new ways to farm and provide crops to people in cities is important because the soil is more acidic than in rural communities making it harder for plants to remain sustainable. Being creative, open-minded, and patient is key when urban farming. Tools like buckets and wheelbarrows can be utilized to elevate the soil so the crops may be sufficient during the colder months. (photo by Briana Clinkscales)

 

Closer to Your Backyard:

Urban farming offers to make food as local as possible so that the number of miles our crops have to travel is decreased and people get the freshest food money can buy. Growing fruits and vegetables in the community guarantees that food is really healthy versus grocery shopping for those same necessities–plus the nutrients, minus the cost. Creativity is the ability to be able to form unique ideas and techniques that become useful. Urban farmers have invented ways to cultivate when the weather isn’t exactly “ideal”. Discarded household items are reused to the advantage of crops in urban communities. Their roots are withdrawn from the soil, and placed in the drawer of an old dresser to remove the plants from the corrupted soil.
(photo by Jedidah Taylor)

Improving the Community:

One Plant at a Time — The simple act of gardening can bring a resolution to issues like economics, health, and politics at the same time because food is an essential focal point of human activity. The Truly Living Well Center in downtown Atlanta brings the community a step closer to becoming agricultural based again. Often times, people forget that agriculture made civilization exist and without it, the community would lack this important aspect. (photo by Briana Clinkscales)

Promoting Healthy Living:

The Truly Living Well Center for Natural Urban Agriculture is an organization that promotes urban gardening. “One of the first steps for beginners in the agricultural world is to simply get involved.” Truly Living Well Center head farmer Kofi Kwayana said. With his hands colorless from the labor put in in the garden, Kwayana takes the time out of this everyday life as a teacher to help his community in a way that is no longer the norm for society—cultivation.
(photo by Briana Clinkscales)

Volunteering for the Home:

Growing and selling sufficient crops are just a couple of ways that the Truly Living Well Center reaches out to the urban community. Volunteers take the time out of their everyday lives to help each other grow and maintain these crops that are eventually sold to the public to offer a healthier option to shop for fruits and vegetables. (photo by Briana Clinkscales)

Agricultural Creativity:

“One of the benefits of growing food in an urban setting is that usually we are pushed to realize more of our potential and become creative in the ways that we garden,” Kwayana said. The ultimate goal of urban farming is to create an abundance of food for people in need by supporting and encouraging the establishment of gardens while increasing diversity, raising awareness for health and wellness, and inspiring and educating people to create an economically sustainable system to uplift communities around the globe. (photo by Briana Clinkscales)

Revitalizing Old Habits:

It’s becoming more unusual to farm, which is why ordinary people volunteer at the Truly Living Well Center to assist with making the urban setting an improving environment. Once fruits and vegetables are ripe, they’re hand picked by the volunteers, packaged, and put on the market for the public to purchase or given to the less fortunate of the urban community. (photo by Jedidah Taylor)

Blast from the Past:

After years of a well structured greenhouse sitting unused, Environmental Science teacher and Science Club sponsor Gretchen Davis took action and earned a grant from the county to renovate the greenhouse. Since the greenhouse has been renovated, the Science Club annually grows and distributes fruits, vegetables, and herbs to teachers on our campus during the holiday season. (photo by Briana Clinkscales)

A Learning Experience:

“Working in the greenhouse gives me a sense of serenity,” senior Lillian Steele said. “I think it’s fortunate that Ms. Davis took the initiative to ask about the grant to fix up an unused space our school and community.” School gardens provide a wealth of opportunities for students to get their hands dirty while learning lifelong lessons that will reside forever, and provide them a hands on experience to reference from in the near future.
(photo by Lindsey Camp)

Trending Now:

With school’s involvement in urban gardening, agricultural practices are growing amongst today’s youth. The spread of agriculture throughout this generation is an objective for McEachern’s leaders, like Davis, who cherishes agricultural practices herself. The Science Club members have fruits and vegetables that they enjoy gardening, and they have their least favorite. Pineapples, cucumbers, and strawberries are the common favorites of the club. (photo by Briana Clinkscales)

Improving Health:

Organic foods are richer in nutrients, meaning that they improve satiety and naturally help regulate body weight. Pesticides are detrimental for the environment and produce considerable damage to ecosystems by polluting the air, water and soil. To refrain from using pesticides, the greenhouse workers find alternative ways to keep insects from destroying their crops by using a method called biological pest control. They use living creatures, like this green anole named Stubby, to control the pest population in the greenhouse.(photo by Briana Clinkscales)

Downtown:

Urban farming is the utilization of unused space to be transformed into a garden to grow crops for people in need in the urban community. Farmers find purpose in empty parking lots, building tops, and the empty space between architecture. Resourcefulness is key during cold weather to ensure that the crops last longer than a season, so raised garden beds are used so that farmers are able to plant earlier in the season by raising the soil off of the ground so that it’s warmer and better drained. (photo by Jedidah Taylor)

by Briana Clinkscales, Staff Writer